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a small person in a big world

kaywalsh☮england☮96☮taken


Laughter is timeless, imagination has no age and dreams are forever.

you have two choices after you wake up;

- sleep again and dream
- wake up and chase your dream

Aug 27th at 12AM / via: kushandwizdom / op: kushandwizdom / 20,673 notes
kushandwizdom:

More good vibes here

kushandwizdom:

More good vibes here


Aug 26th at 6PM / via: fakehorror / op: fakehorror / 14 notes

fakehorror:

SS14 look, inspired by chronic eczema flare up due to excessive sugar consumption


steroid-induced-eczema:

Happy 3rd week on Paleo for me :)
Updates: Wheat cravings are now gone and proper meals have eliminated my need for snacking as well. 
Sleep is much easier and last longer without my usual random waking up.
Itching is still significantly down, some days I don’t itch my legs at all.
Legs are healing at a good rate, more than I’m scratching them because of the steroid induced eczema. 
Arms clearing up but still flaring because of steroid induced eczema as well.
Here is the Paleo food list with explanations for the why’s and how’s :)

Paleo Diet Food List

In a nutshell, Paleo lifestyle and diet take inspiration and cues from our ancestors and the way we used to eat and live. It’s not about re-enacting the caveman era but instead it’s fueled by modern scientific and medical research and common sense.
The diet focuses on unprocessed, whole foods, lots of healthy fats including saturated fat, grass-fed, free-range meat and eggs, lots of fish and seafood, vegetables, fruit, berries, nuts, seeds and some natural sweeteners. It excludes grains, legumes, processed sugar and most dairy. Some include healthy dairy foods like kefir, full fat natural yogurt, some aged cheese and butter of course – it really depends on your sensitivities. I love this way of eating because it also focused on local, organic produce and good farming practices.
The paleo or primal lifestyle also promotes healthier sleeping habits, stress reduction, functional fitness, adequate sun exposure, avoiding environmental toxins and so on. Above all, paleo is not a set of strict rules, it’s more of a framework that you can adapt based on your own goals, health, gender, age, location and current lifestyle. It’s a very holistic approach to wellbeing. Read more about my practical approach to paleo here.
Here is a summary of what’s in and what’s out on the Paleo food list (well at least my Paleo food list):
What’s In:
Meat and poultry (including offal) – grass-fed, free range meat is not only a kinder and more ethical way to consume animal products but it is also much higher in nutrients because of the way the cattle was fed and raised. I have a great little interview with a cattle farmer talking about the benefits of grass-fed, pasture raised cattle meat here.
Fish and seafood – try to choose sustainable, wild fish and seafood when possible
Eggs – free-range, pasture raised whenever possible
Vegetables – non-starchy and starchy tubers and root vegetables
Fruit and berries – stick to low sugar fruit and berries and keep high sugar fruit like bananas and mangos for days when you need a higher carbohydrate intake or when in season and tasting delicious.
Nuts and seeds – these guys are nutritious but many nuts and seeds are high in Omega-6 fatty acids which can be pro-inflammatory if consumed in large quantities and when your diet is not balanced out by an equal amount of Omega-3 fatty acids found in oily fish like salmon and sardines, eggs and leafy greens. Basically, don’t gorge on buckets of nuts and seeds every day. The same goes for nut meals and flours such as almond meal.
Spices and herbs – go to town, the more the better! As for salt, use good quality sea salt or Celtic salt to get beneficial minerals and be sensible with it. I love spices and herbs so much, I wrote an e-Book about it.
Healthy fats like coconut oil, coconut milk and cream, ghee, butter (yep, it’s mostly fat so no problems with lactose), duck fat, olive oil, avocado oil, macadamia nut oil, fish oil, sesame oil as well as from grass-fed meats, poultry and fish.
Condiments like mustard, fish good, quality vinegars such as Apple Cider with mother in it or aged Balsamic, olive oil mayonnaise, low sugar tomato sauces and paste, anchovies, olives, gherkins, capers, salsas and pestos – are all fine, just make sure no nasty chemicals and preservatives are added. Wheat free soy sauce such as Tamari and naturally derived oyster sauce are ok every now and again but it’s better to try something like coconut aminos.
For baking – nut meals, coconut flour, tapioca and arrowroot flour, sweet potato flour, chestnut flour – use in moderation as these guys are either still high in carbohydrates or may contain high amounts of Omega-6 fatty acids.
Out
Grains - especially wheat and anything with gluten. White rice is the least harmful of all grains and is often added to dishes on occasions for variety but it’s still very high in carbohydrates and should be kept to ‘occasional’ use. Learn more about why grains are avoided in the paleo diet here.
Legumes – beans, lentils, chickpeas and so on. Cashews are not legumes! There are some debates over whether some legumes are safe to consume in moderation if prepared properly (soaked for 12 hours and then cooked really well to remove the phytic acid and make them easier to digest). You can read this article by Dr. Chris Kresser and this article by Dr. Loren Cordain and make up your own mind like I do.
Refined sugars and carbohydrates – bread, pasta, cookies, white sugar, artificial sugar, high frutcose syrup, sodas, fruit juices and so on.
Dairy, especially milk and low fat dairy  and for those with damaged gut or gluten/lactose intolerances. If you’re concerned about calcium intake on a paleo diet read this post.
Processed cooking oils and fats such as canola oil, soybean oil, vegetable, rapeseed and sunflower oils and margarines and spreads made with such oils. Read my post onhealthy cooking fats and oils here.
Gluten containing products
Ok, on occasion:
Dairy should mainly be avoided, especially if you suffer from gut problems and gluten intolerances, but if you’re in good health and have no sensitivities to lactose (sugars in milk) or casein (protein in milk) then a little healthy dairy can go a long way. Avoid cow’s milk as it’s got high GI unlike cheese or yogurt. Better options are goat’s and sheep’s milk products, A2 cow’s milk and cow’s milk fermented products like kefir, unsweetened yogurt, aged cheeses,  full fat cream, butter, and ricotta.
Natural sweeteners – honey, maple syrup, molasses, dried fruit, dark chocolate, palm sugar, rice malt syrup for those avoiding fructose.
Alcohol – dry wines, clean non-grain based spirits.
Fermented soy such miso, tempeh in small amounts, wheat free soy sauce
Pseudograins like quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat are less harmful but they are still dense sources of carbohydrates and should be prepared carefully to remove some of the anti-nutrients such as phytic acid. Soak such grains in salted water for 8-12 hours, rinse and then cook well before consuming. Chia seeds also fall in this category.
Fresh corn, green beans and green peas fall into grain/legume category but in my eyes they are totally fine to use every now and then and especially when in season and local.
Need some help with paleo shopping? Check out my ultimate paleo shopping list here. Not sure what Paleo is all about? Read a little bit about it here.
This eBook guide to paleo is a fantastic resource that is beautifully designed and easy to follow. Lots of fun graphics to get complex concepts and science across.

Looking for additional reading on Paleo or Primal nutrition? Check out these guide books:
Optimal Health The Paleo Way by Claire Yates
Personal Paleo Code by Chriss Kresser
The Paleo Solution by Robb Wolf, a must read!
The Primal Blueprint by Mark Sisson
Practical Paleo by Diane Sanfilippo

steroid-induced-eczema:

Happy 3rd week on Paleo for me :)

Updates: Wheat cravings are now gone and proper meals have eliminated my need for snacking as well. 

Sleep is much easier and last longer without my usual random waking up.

Itching is still significantly down, some days I don’t itch my legs at all.

Legs are healing at a good rate, more than I’m scratching them because of the steroid induced eczema. 

Arms clearing up but still flaring because of steroid induced eczema as well.

Here is the Paleo food list with explanations for the why’s and how’s :)

Paleo Diet Food List

In a nutshell, Paleo lifestyle and diet take inspiration and cues from our ancestors and the way we used to eat and live. It’s not about re-enacting the caveman era but instead it’s fueled by modern scientific and medical research and common sense.

The diet focuses on unprocessed, whole foods, lots of healthy fats including saturated fat, grass-fed, free-range meat and eggs, lots of fish and seafood, vegetables, fruit, berries, nuts, seeds and some natural sweeteners. It excludes grains, legumes, processed sugar and most dairy. Some include healthy dairy foods like kefir, full fat natural yogurt, some aged cheese and butter of course – it really depends on your sensitivities. I love this way of eating because it also focused on local, organic produce and good farming practices.

The paleo or primal lifestyle also promotes healthier sleeping habits, stress reduction, functional fitness, adequate sun exposure, avoiding environmental toxins and so on. Above all, paleo is not a set of strict rules, it’s more of a framework that you can adapt based on your own goals, health, gender, age, location and current lifestyle. It’s a very holistic approach to wellbeing. Read more about my practical approach to paleo here.

Here is a summary of what’s in and what’s out on the Paleo food list (well at least my Paleo food list):

What’s In:

  • Meat and poultry (including offal) – grass-fed, free range meat is not only a kinder and more ethical way to consume animal products but it is also much higher in nutrients because of the way the cattle was fed and raised. I have a great little interview with a cattle farmer talking about the benefits of grass-fed, pasture raised cattle meat here.
  • Fish and seafood – try to choose sustainable, wild fish and seafood when possible
  • Eggs – free-range, pasture raised whenever possible
  • Vegetables – non-starchy and starchy tubers and root vegetables
  • Fruit and berries – stick to low sugar fruit and berries and keep high sugar fruit like bananas and mangos for days when you need a higher carbohydrate intake or when in season and tasting delicious.
  • Nuts and seeds – these guys are nutritious but many nuts and seeds are high in Omega-6 fatty acids which can be pro-inflammatory if consumed in large quantities and when your diet is not balanced out by an equal amount of Omega-3 fatty acids found in oily fish like salmon and sardines, eggs and leafy greens. Basically, don’t gorge on buckets of nuts and seeds every day. The same goes for nut meals and flours such as almond meal.
  • Spices and herbs – go to town, the more the better! As for salt, use good quality sea salt or Celtic salt to get beneficial minerals and be sensible with it. I love spices and herbs so much, I wrote an e-Book about it.
  • Healthy fats like coconut oil, coconut milk and cream, ghee, butter (yep, it’s mostly fat so no problems with lactose), duck fat, olive oil, avocado oil, macadamia nut oil, fish oil, sesame oil as well as from grass-fed meats, poultry and fish.
  • Condiments like mustard, fish good, quality vinegars such as Apple Cider with mother in it or aged Balsamic, olive oil mayonnaise, low sugar tomato sauces and paste, anchovies, olives, gherkins, capers, salsas and pestos – are all fine, just make sure no nasty chemicals and preservatives are added. Wheat free soy sauce such as Tamari and naturally derived oyster sauce are ok every now and again but it’s better to try something like coconut aminos.
  • For baking – nut meals, coconut flour, tapioca and arrowroot flour, sweet potato flour, chestnut flour – use in moderation as these guys are either still high in carbohydrates or may contain high amounts of Omega-6 fatty acids.

Out

  • Grains - especially wheat and anything with gluten. White rice is the least harmful of all grains and is often added to dishes on occasions for variety but it’s still very high in carbohydrates and should be kept to ‘occasional’ use. Learn more about why grains are avoided in the paleo diet here.
  • Legumes – beans, lentils, chickpeas and so on. Cashews are not legumes! There are some debates over whether some legumes are safe to consume in moderation if prepared properly (soaked for 12 hours and then cooked really well to remove the phytic acid and make them easier to digest). You can read this article by Dr. Chris Kresser and this article by Dr. Loren Cordain and make up your own mind like I do.
  • Refined sugars and carbohydrates – bread, pasta, cookies, white sugar, artificial sugar, high frutcose syrup, sodas, fruit juices and so on.
  • Dairy, especially milk and low fat dairy  and for those with damaged gut or gluten/lactose intolerances. If you’re concerned about calcium intake on a paleo diet read this post.
  • Processed cooking oils and fats such as canola oil, soybean oil, vegetable, rapeseed and sunflower oils and margarines and spreads made with such oils. Read my post onhealthy cooking fats and oils here.
  • Gluten containing products

Ok, on occasion:

  • Dairy should mainly be avoided, especially if you suffer from gut problems and gluten intolerances, but if you’re in good health and have no sensitivities to lactose (sugars in milk) or casein (protein in milk) then a little healthy dairy can go a long way. Avoid cow’s milk as it’s got high GI unlike cheese or yogurt. Better options are goat’s and sheep’s milk products, A2 cow’s milk and cow’s milk fermented products like kefir, unsweetened yogurt, aged cheeses,  full fat cream, butter, and ricotta.
  • Natural sweeteners – honey, maple syrup, molasses, dried fruit, dark chocolate, palm sugar, rice malt syrup for those avoiding fructose.
  • Alcohol – dry wines, clean non-grain based spirits.
  • Fermented soy such miso, tempeh in small amounts, wheat free soy sauce
  • Pseudograins like quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat are less harmful but they are still dense sources of carbohydrates and should be prepared carefully to remove some of the anti-nutrients such as phytic acid. Soak such grains in salted water for 8-12 hours, rinse and then cook well before consuming. Chia seeds also fall in this category.
  • Fresh corn, green beans and green peas fall into grain/legume category but in my eyes they are totally fine to use every now and then and especially when in season and local.

Need some help with paleo shopping? Check out my ultimate paleo shopping list here. Not sure what Paleo is all about? Read a little bit about it here.

This eBook guide to paleo is a fantastic resource that is beautifully designed and easy to follow. Lots of fun graphics to get complex concepts and science across.

Your Guide to Paleo

Looking for additional reading on Paleo or Primal nutrition? Check out these guide books:

Optimal Health The Paleo Way by Claire Yates

Personal Paleo Code by Chriss Kresser

The Paleo Solution by Robb Wolf, a must read!

The Primal Blueprint by Mark Sisson

Practical Paleo by Diane Sanfilippo


allthe-wrongplaces:

The bane of my existence is people who comment on my skin conditions and make fucking stupid comments like ‘why don’t you just leave it alone’ or ‘have you tried putting cream on it’ Firstly YES, I’VE HAD BOTH CONDITIONS FOR 13 AND 15 YEARS RESPECTIVELY. Secondly, kindly go and FUCK YOURSELF.

also I’m 100% aware that it ruins the appearance of my skin, pointing it out just makes you look like a twat.


Product Review & Recommendation: Hiding Scars, Hyper-pigmentation, Discolouration and uneven skin tone

steroid-induced-eczema:

Eczema is a distressing condition that makes you so aware of how your skin looks, you were forced early on to scrutinise, take care of it and pay attention to it. As a result you are self conscious of how it looks all the time and self conscious of how it appears to others. Most people are…


sanwichsays:

Just a reminder to myself and other fellow Red Skinners that you are NOT UGLY. You are ILL. You will get better, it will just take some time and a lot (lots, lots, lots, lots) of patience.


Aug 26th at 6PM / via: starberth / op: starberth / 20 notes
starberth:

Now look me in the eye and tell me one is more beautiful than the other.

Walking out of the house with eczema, acne, rosacea, psoriasis, glasses of any prescription, shadows, sunburn, scars, freckles, moles, hearing aids, and/or out of control hair—is its own kind of fierce.  And it shouldn’t have to be.  Those who say or make you feel otherwise are probably uncomfortable in their own skins.

Whether you leave the house today or stay in, wear makeup or go bareface, I hope you know that you’re beautiful.  Utterly and completely.

You are.

starberth:

Now look me in the eye and tell me one is more beautiful than the other.

Walking out of the house with eczema, acne, rosacea, psoriasis, glasses of any prescription, shadows, sunburn, scars, freckles, moles, hearing aids, and/or out of control hair—is its own kind of fierce. And it shouldn’t have to be. Those who say or make you feel otherwise are probably uncomfortable in their own skins.

Whether you leave the house today or stay in, wear makeup or go bareface, I hope you know that you’re beautiful. Utterly and completely.

You are.


"

A shocking 47% per cent of people with a skin disease in the UK have been victims of verbal abuse one or more times from another member of the public, a new snapshot survey reveals.

The online survey, conducted by the national skin disease research charity, the British Skin Foundation (BSF), also discovered that a further one in six (16%) people admitting to having self-harmed as a result of their skin disease. Disturbingly, seven people out of all those who took part said they had attempted suicide, with another 17% (125 
respondents) stating they had contemplated suicide at some stage.

A total of 729 people were asked a series of questions relating to their skin disease or that of the person they care for.
Questions were asked on the ways skin disease affects daily life, including forming sexual relations, social life and work life.
The results show that the long-term effects of skin disease can have a devastating impact on sufferers’ lives in ways few would expect.

Many skin diseases, such as vitiligo and psoriasis, can be very noticeable and visually striking, and likely to provoke a response from an untrained eye. Worryingly, a fifth of respondents described that they had been victim to regular bullying because of their condition, whilst one in every eight people who took part said they had suffered some form of physical abuse from another member of the public at least once.

Common conditions such as eczema and even acne, can affect people on a long-term basis. Asked to rank what they felt
were the top three areas affected by their skin condition, seventy percent said a fall in self-confidence was their biggest
issue, 42% said it impacted on their work and more than half (56%) said making friends was one of their biggest problems
when it came to skin disease.

For many, sadly, having a skin disease had implications for their romantic and sexual relationships, with a fifth of participants (75 people) who answered that question stating that their skin disease was the driving factor for the breakdown of their most recent relationship or a previous one.

Living with a skin disease can prove to be a hugely stressful experience, a previous survey conducted by the BSF last year revealed that almost half of respondents suffered from sleep deprivation caused by severe pain and/or itching. Other factors that contributed to feelings of stress included sufferers feeling ‘over-reliant’ on others for care, hospitalisation for treatment, and time off work or even unemployment. What’s more, a study conducted in 2001 showed how acne, one of the most common skin diseases affecting over 90% of males and 80% of females by the age of 21, impacted on the mental health of 14 to 16 years olds. It was found that those with definite acne, particularly girls, had higher levels of emotional and behavioural difficulties, yet less than a third of participants had sought help from a doctor, with boys less likely to talk to friends and family about their acne.

Dr Anthony Bewley, a spokesperson for the British Skin Foundation and a psychodermatologist, is hopeful about what the survey can highlight to the public. He says: “It’s important that we consider these results. Patients with skin disease often feel enormously upset about their skin condition, as it affects their confidence and self-esteem in so many different ways.
All too often the impact of skin disease is underestimated, and this research makes it very clear that it is common for individuals with skin disease to consider suicide. Many patients consider their skin conditions to be more psychologically damaging than diabetes or heart disease.”

Matthew Patey, Chief Executive of the British Skin Foundation, says: “The results makes for depressing reading, but reflect the life-altering problems faced by many people living with a skin disease. Clearly there is an ongoing need for better awareness amongst the general population about what skin disease is and crucially, how severe conditions can get.
We have to remember that, aside from the symptomatic effect any skin disease will have on the sufferer, it can also have a devastating effect on social relations, people around them and cause lasting damage to a person’s mental health as well.”

Summary of key findings from the survey:

Suicide and self-harm
• 17% (125 people) of participants had contemplated suicide.
• Percentage of respondents who had attempted suicide: 1% (7 people)
• 16% of participants said they had self-harmed because of their disease.

Impact on social life and relationships
• 68% said a fall in self-confidence was the number one issue caused by their skin disease.
• 29% claimed their skin disease was an active barrier in finding a partner.
• 42% said the second biggest area affected was their work life.
• 56% said making new friends was the third biggest issue.
• One in five (19%) people with a skin disease had experienced a relationship breakdown.

Daily Life
• Participants who had been verbally abused by a member of public at least once: 46% (179)
• One in eight people (12%, 46 people) had suffered physical abuse by another member of the public at least once
• Participants who had been bullied regularly: 20%
• 37% (144 people) had received unfair treatment at work or full time education.

"


itsbrittanybiiitch:

Also fuck whoever makes me feel bad for this because I can’t fucking control it and I didn’t ask for it and it’s not my fucking fault or choice


experiencelife:

Fatigue. Eczema. Constipation. Common signals from your body you shouldn’t ignore.
“What Your Body Is Trying to Tell You" (Infographic)

experiencelife:

Fatigue. Eczema. Constipation. Common signals from your body you shouldn’t ignore.

What Your Body Is Trying to Tell You" (Infographic)


http://sirprise.tumblr.com/post/95846095408/wildsamappears-hey-yo-anyone-here-got-any

wildsamappears:

Hey yo, anyone here got any experience of having tattoos on areas that were once -and might still be- affected by eczema?

My arms have been shit for years because of it, but I figure there’d be much more of an incentive to do the boring rub lotion on them everyday if there…


steroid-induced-eczema:


How Alkalising your Diet Helps Alleviate Eczema Symptoms and Reduce Internal Inflammation

Creating an alkaline environment in your body is very important for eczema sufferers to reduce or stop inflammation.
From the article on Eczema on Women’s Health:

Making a conscious effort to change the diet will help to alleviate eczema symptoms. It is recommended to remove food allergies, drink lots of water, avoid the triggers (usually acidic food), and change the diet to 90 – 100% alkaline foods. Alkalizing the body will help relieve eczema. Certain foods are acid-forming to the body (see list below) and when they are digested, they produce acid which acts like a toxin to the body. The acid circulates throughout the body causing damage to every cell wherever it goes through 60,000 miles of arteries, veins, and capillaries. To protect itself, your body stores the acid into the fat cells, but it cannot store everything. Then calcium and other acid neutralizing nutrients are taken from the body to neutralize the excess acid. This may cause osteoporosis. If there is still more acid, the body cannot stop it from causing damage to the vital organs or from being leeched through to the skin. This may cause skin problems like itching, dryness, rashes, and eczema. Hence, an alkaline diet is important to health as well as to prevent eczema symptoms. To monitor pH levels of the body, purchase pH paper from the drug store and test urine, which should be 6.6 – 7.0 pH (7.0 is neutral, not acidic nor alkaline).

From Just Mommies article by Dr Lisa Benest  "Dry Skin and Eczema Treatment starts with Balancing PH"

Resolving dry skin may be as simple as balancing your pH, and it’s easy to do. Resolving dry skin and eczema sometimes requires internal and external treatment. Even a really great dry skin care product isn’t going to get great results if an internal condition is working against it. Expecting your skin condition to improve when you’re loading up on junk food and sugar is a good example. However, there are some factors much more subtle than junk food diets: one of the most basic is pH. Maintaining both internal and external pH is vital to any dry skin or eczema treatment protocol.Although most of us are familiar with the term pH, not many really understand its full significance. Here’s how it works:
When your body metabolizes food it leaves a residue. When the residue mixes with bodily fluids, it has both acid and alkaline properties. Protein and carbohydrates usually form acid residues, and fruits and vegetables usually form alkaline. When the body is acidic, there is a higher level of hydrogen than oxygen. If it is alkaline, there is more oxygen than hydrogen. pH is an abbreviation for ‘power of hydrogen.’
The scale that measures pH goes from 0 to 14. The number represents the balance between acid and alkaline and is called the pH factor. Inside a healthy body, the acid and alkaline are approximately equal: the pH is between 7.3 and 7.4. Below that is too acidic, above is too alkaline. Even slight changes can affect the body negatively.
When the body is too acidic, for example, the body treats the acids like toxins. Imagine the damage that could be done by an acid traveling through 60,000 miles of arteries, veins and capillaries to every cell in the body and you’ll understand why.
To avoid this damage, the body stores excess acid in fat tissues, but it can only store so much. When it goes beyond the normal storage capacity, the body leaches acid-neutralizing nutrients like calcium from other parts of the body – which can cause osteoporosis – or holds onto fat cells so the toxins won’t be released into the rest of the body. If you’re overweight or having trouble losing weight, by the way, this might be a factor.
When all attempts to neutralize the acid fail, the acid penetrates vital organs and is excreted through the skin causing dry skin, eruptions, rashes and eczema.
High pH, too alkaline, also causes problems.
The pH of normal skin is slightly acidic: it ranges from 4 to 6.5. This acidic environment is referred to as the skin’s ‘acid mantle’, and contains a number of different acids including lactic acid, amino acids and free fatty acids. One of the major functions of the acid mantle is to protect the skin and body from the absorption of bacteria: bacteria cannot survive in an acidic environment.
If the acid mantle is disrupted, the skin becomes more susceptible to damage. Although acid and alkaline are on opposite ends of the spectrum, either disrupts the pH and either can cause dry skin and cause or exacerbate eczema.
Alkaline stronger than pH 8 is very irritating to the skin and, unfortunately, the majority of skin care products, even those formulated for dry skin are far too alkaline. Most soap has a pH factor of 9 to 11. Household cleansers are even worse – many range between 10 and 12, and oven cleaners are around pH 13 – which is why someone with dry skin should protect their hands even when just washing the dishes. You can use rubber gloves, or try a shielding lotion. A good shielding lotion bonds with the outer layer of the skin to form a protective layer that doesn’t wash off.
Balancing your pH both internally and externally should be the first step when trying to resolve dry skin or eczema. You can test your internal pH with kits available at drug stores. If you find the balance is too acidic, eat more fruits and vegetables. If it’s too alkaline, increase proteins and carbohydrates. Supplements that balance pH are also available.
To maintain proper pH balance on the skin, check the packaging of products before you buy them and look for a pH value of 4.0 to 6.5 or the statement “pH balanced”, which means it has been formulated especially for the skin.
The combination of changing your diet appropriately and using dry skin care products with the right pH balance may be all you need to protect against, and even heal, dry skin and eczema.

Here is a video titled
 "Curing Eczema with Diet" 
interviews Karen Fischer, author of The Eczema Diet who explains more about Alkaline foods for eczema. 

steroid-induced-eczema:

How Alkalising your Diet Helps Alleviate Eczema Symptoms and Reduce Internal Inflammation

Creating an alkaline environment in your body is very important for eczema sufferers to reduce or stop inflammation.

From the article on Eczema on Women’s Health:

Making a conscious effort to change the diet will help to alleviate eczema symptoms. It is recommended to remove food allergies, drink lots of water, avoid the triggers (usually acidic food), and change the diet to 90 – 100% alkaline foods. Alkalizing the body will help relieve eczema. Certain foods are acid-forming to the body (see list below) and when they are digested, they produce acid which acts like a toxin to the body. The acid circulates throughout the body causing damage to every cell wherever it goes through 60,000 miles of arteries, veins, and capillaries. To protect itself, your body stores the acid into the fat cells, but it cannot store everything. Then calcium and other acid neutralizing nutrients are taken from the body to neutralize the excess acid. This may cause osteoporosis. If there is still more acid, the body cannot stop it from causing damage to the vital organs or from being leeched through to the skin. This may cause skin problems like itching, dryness, rashes, and eczema. Hence, an alkaline diet is important to health as well as to prevent eczema symptoms. To monitor pH levels of the body, purchase pH paper from the drug store and test urine, which should be 6.6 – 7.0 pH (7.0 is neutral, not acidic nor alkaline).

From Just Mommies article by Dr Lisa Benest  "Dry Skin and Eczema Treatment starts with Balancing PH"

Resolving dry skin may be as simple as balancing your pH, and it’s easy to do. Resolving dry skin and eczema sometimes requires internal and external treatment. Even a really great dry skin care product isn’t going to get great results if an internal condition is working against it. Expecting your skin condition to improve when you’re loading up on junk food and sugar is a good example. However, there are some factors much more subtle than junk food diets: one of the most basic is pH. Maintaining both internal and external pH is vital to any dry skin or eczema treatment protocol.
Although most of us are familiar with the term pH, not many really understand its full significance. Here’s how it works:

When your body metabolizes food it leaves a residue. When the residue mixes with bodily fluids, it has both acid and alkaline properties. Protein and carbohydrates usually form acid residues, and fruits and vegetables usually form alkaline. When the body is acidic, there is a higher level of hydrogen than oxygen. If it is alkaline, there is more oxygen than hydrogen. pH is an abbreviation for ‘power of hydrogen.’

The scale that measures pH goes from 0 to 14. The number represents the balance between acid and alkaline and is called the pH factor. Inside a healthy body, the acid and alkaline are approximately equal: the pH is between 7.3 and 7.4. Below that is too acidic, above is too alkaline. Even slight changes can affect the body negatively.

When the body is too acidic, for example, the body treats the acids like toxins. Imagine the damage that could be done by an acid traveling through 60,000 miles of arteries, veins and capillaries to every cell in the body and you’ll understand why.

To avoid this damage, the body stores excess acid in fat tissues, but it can only store so much. When it goes beyond the normal storage capacity, the body leaches acid-neutralizing nutrients like calcium from other parts of the body – which can cause osteoporosis – or holds onto fat cells so the toxins won’t be released into the rest of the body. If you’re overweight or having trouble losing weight, by the way, this might be a factor.

When all attempts to neutralize the acid fail, the acid penetrates vital organs and is excreted through the skin causing dry skin, eruptions, rashes and eczema.

High pH, too alkaline, also causes problems.

The pH of normal skin is slightly acidic: it ranges from 4 to 6.5. This acidic environment is referred to as the skin’s ‘acid mantle’, and contains a number of different acids including lactic acid, amino acids and free fatty acids. One of the major functions of the acid mantle is to protect the skin and body from the absorption of bacteria: bacteria cannot survive in an acidic environment.

If the acid mantle is disrupted, the skin becomes more susceptible to damage. Although acid and alkaline are on opposite ends of the spectrum, either disrupts the pH and either can cause dry skin and cause or exacerbate eczema.

Alkaline stronger than pH 8 is very irritating to the skin and, unfortunately, the majority of skin care products, even those formulated for dry skin are far too alkaline. Most soap has a pH factor of 9 to 11. Household cleansers are even worse – many range between 10 and 12, and oven cleaners are around pH 13 – which is why someone with dry skin should protect their hands even when just washing the dishes. You can use rubber gloves, or try a shielding lotion. A good shielding lotion bonds with the outer layer of the skin to form a protective layer that doesn’t wash off.

Balancing your pH both internally and externally should be the first step when trying to resolve dry skin or eczema. You can test your internal pH with kits available at drug stores. If you find the balance is too acidic, eat more fruits and vegetables. If it’s too alkaline, increase proteins and carbohydrates. Supplements that balance pH are also available.

To maintain proper pH balance on the skin, check the packaging of products before you buy them and look for a pH value of 4.0 to 6.5 or the statement “pH balanced”, which means it has been formulated especially for the skin.

The combination of changing your diet appropriately and using dry skin care products with the right pH balance may be all you need to protect against, and even heal, dry skin and eczema.


Here is a video titled

"Curing Eczema with Diet" 

interviews Karen Fischer, author of The Eczema Diet who explains more about Alkaline foods for eczema. 


A day in the life

always-watching-the-skies:

So i spent a little bit thinking about how different the lives are of people who are severely atopic. So many people just think it’s “oh you have to moisturize a little more here and there.” No. It’s an everyday struggle that absolutely sucks.

Most people can basically hop out of bed, shower,…


cheerleader-till-the-day-i-die:

I’m so jealous of people who have nice clear skin :/ I have to deal with this revolting eczema on my legs,back,and arms and it makes you feel hideous I hope one day it can heal


Marcie Ranting About Eczema

cinderidiot:

I HAVE ECZEMA

"Ew gross get away"

NO, ITS NOT CONTAGIOUS YOU SELF PRESERVING PRICK

YES IT HURTS A LOT

"Just stop scratching"

NO I CANT JUST ‘stop scratching’ DO YOU EVEN UNDERSTAND WHAT ECZEMA IS.

"Just moisturize more then"

HA WELL WOOPDIE DO. HOW COME I NEVER THOUGHT OF THAT? OR MY…